Red Raspberry

Rubus idaeus, Rosaceae

Red Raspberry Raspberry is the edible fruit of a multitude of plant species in the genus Rubus. Raspberries are perennial. The name originally referred to the European species Rubus idaeus (with red fruit), and is still used as its standard English name.[1] The fruit is harvested when it comes off the torus/receptacle easily and has turned a deep color (red, black, purple, or golden yellow, depending on the species and cultivar). This is when the fruits are ripest and sweetest. Excess fruit can be made into raspberry jam or frozen.

The leaves can be used fresh or dried in herbal and medicinal teas. They have an astringent flavor, and in herbal medicine are reputed to be effective in regulating menses.

An individual raspberry weighs about 4 g, on average and is made up of around 100 drupelets, each of which consists of a juicy pulp and a single central seed.[1] Raspberry bushes can yield several hundred berries a year. Unlike blackberries and dewberries, a raspberry has a hollow core once it is removed from the receptacle. Raspberries contain significant amounts of polyphenol antioxidants such as anthocyanin pigments linked to potential health protection against several human diseases.[2][3][4][5] The aggregate fruit structure contributes to its nutritional value, as it increases the proportion of dietary fiber, placing it among plant foods with the highest fiber contents known, up to 20% fiber per total weight.[2] Raspberries are a rich source of vitamin C, with 30 mg per serving of 1 cup (about 50% daily value), manganese (about 60% daily value) and dietary fiber (30% daily value). Contents of B vitamins 1-3, folic acid, magnesium, copper and iron are considerable in raspberries. Raspberries rank near the top of all fruits for antioxidant strength, particularly due to their dense contents of ellagic acid (from ellagotannins, see for instance raspberry ellagitannin), quercetin, gallic acid, anthocyanins, cyanidins, pelargonidins, catechins, kaempferol and salicylic acid.[4] Yellow raspberries and others with pale-colored fruits are lower in anthocyanins.

[1] Huxley, A., ed. (1992). New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. Macmillan ISBN 0-333-47494-5.

[2] Wu X, Beecher GR, Holden JM, Haytowitz DB, Gebhardt SE, Prior RL (June 2004). “Lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidant capacities of common foods in the United States”. J. Agric. Food Chem. 52 (12): 4026–37.

[3] Liu M, Li XQ, Weber C, Lee CY, Brown J, Liu RH (May 2002). “Antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of raspberries”. J. Agric. Food Chem. 50 (10): 2926–30.

[4] Heinonen M (June 2007). “Antioxidant activity and antimicrobial effect of berry phenolics—a Finnish perspective”. Mol Nutr Food Res 51 (6): 684–91.

[5] Cerdá B, Tomás-Barberán FA, Espín JC (January 2005). “Metabolism of antioxidant and chemopreventive ellagitannins from strawberries, raspberries, walnuts, and oak-aged wine in humans: identification of biomarkers and individual variability”. J. Agric. Food Chem. 53 (2): 227–35.

Products that contain Red Raspberry

Female Tone
Vitex/Red Raspberry Elixir